Six Sigma Standard

DMAIC process

Q: How are the new ISO 13053-1:2011 Quantitative methods in process improvement – Six Sigma – Part 1: DMAIC methodology, and ISO 13053-2:2011 Quantitative methods in process improvement – Six Sigma – Part 2: Tools and techniques standards to be used?

Is it for certifying Green and Black Belts, or what?  Are there plans for “registering companies” to the standard?  Thanks in advance for your response.

A: The scope of ISO 13053-1:2011 is to “recommend the preferred or best practice for each of the stages of the DMAIC methodology used during the execution of a Six Sigma project. It also recommends how Six Sigma projects should be managed and the roles of personnel involved in such projects. It is applicable to organizations using manufacturing processes as well as service and transactional processes.”

Similarly, the scope of ISO 13053-2:2011 is to “describe the tools and techniques to be used at each phase in the DMAIC approach illustrating them through fact sheets.”

There is no plan at this point to develop documents that have for intent, or scope, to certify Six Sigma Belts or to register companies to the standard.

Michele Boulanger
U.S. TAG to ISO/TC 69 Chair, SC7 Expert

Delta Triangle

Manufacturing, inspection, exclusions

Question

When revising drawings to include the delta triangle in the title block, does the drawing index sheet also contain the triangle in the title block?

Answer

The term “delta” refers to a triangle placed on the drawing for reference. The triangle is commonly placed next to a dimension, such as 2.65, 5, or other locations where it applies to a feature or item. This is used to refer the reader to a general note that relates to this item.

So if the delta triangle is used as a reference in your main title block, then I would say yes, add it to the index sheet if it makes the reference more clear.

In addition to drawing a reader’s attention to notes, the delta triangle is also quite often used with print revisions. For example, if a drawing was a revision 2, and then a new revision is generated. It might say something simple like, Rev. 3- 2.235 dimension changed to 2.240. Then a delta triangle with the number 3 in it would be next to the 2.240 dimension referring to the revision.

Bud Salsbury
ASQ Senior Member, CQT, CQI

ANSI/ASQC C1-1996 Supplier Testing

Schedule, calendar, timeline

Q: I need clarification on the following, please:

ANSI/ASQC C1-1996 — Specification of General Requirements for a Quality Program — has been included in the required specifications from a prospective customer. Section 3.3.4 states (in the last sentence) “Furthermore, the validity of certifications shall be periodically verified by the buyer through independent testing.”

What criteria (time-frame, suppliers, mills, etc.) should be used to comply with “periodically?”

What testing is to be performed for the required independent testing? Is it to be only a chemical analysis, or are mechanical tests to be performed as well?

Does this standard require independent testing of materials in purchased components such as gaskets, glass, bolts and fittings, or is “raw materials” only meant to be the base materials such as plate and sheet steel that we purchase?

A: To begin with, most establishments, including your customer, already know that materials most often come with material test certificates.  For example, when you order a sheet of steel from EMJ Metals or another supplier, they will supply a test certificate along with it.

The certificates include that data which would be most important to your customer such as chemical analysis, mechanical properties, ASTM specifications, etc. You are probably already aware of all this.

As for “periodic” and “independent” testing, here is my opinion:

If you have, in writing, a document stating that all purchased materials will be subject to receiving inspection and such inspections will verify that customer requirements have been met, that will be step 1.

For step 2, if you go to the web site of almost any materials supplier, they will have documentation (quality manual, ISO certification, etc.) which you can use as evidence they are a qualified supplier.

You can then contact that supplier and ask if they will verify, in writing, that they also test the material they are sending.  Steel suppliers, like most material suppliers, sell what they receive from the original mills.  The material certs they provide to you are made of tests the mills run.  A company such as EMJ, which I mentioned earlier, uses what is called a Niton tester to verify chemical make up of the product which they buy and in turn sell to their customers.

Finally, step 3: as with any quality management system, you must “do what you say you do.”  So, if you say that part of your receiving inspection includes hardness testing, be ready to provide evidence of that (incoming inspection reports).

In closing, I feel confident that if you prepare the steps noted above, or something similar and communicate this to your potential customer, they will be doubly satisfied with your company. Doubly because all of this would display evidence of an organization with a mature QMS.

Bud Salsbury,
ASQ Senior Member, CQT,CQI