AS9100 Production Rough Card

Aerospace, AS9100, Requirements, Standard

Question

According to our customer requirement, our quality inspectors are signing each step in production rough card in the following way: they apply their personal stamp (which includes their first and last name and personal number), add a manual signature and date. I tried to convince our customer to give us permission to eliminate the manual signature (as the personal stamp and date are enough), but he doesn’t agree with me.

Is there any official standard for this procedure? I was not able to find any special requirement for this in AS9100 Rev. C  – Requirements for Aviation, Space and Defense Organizations.

Answer

The AS9100 standard does not dictate any specific method of recording that a production step (clause 7.5.1) or verification step (clause 8.2.4) is complete. AS9100 does require the organization to comply with customer requirements. So this is a requirement which you need to discuss with your customer.

Buddy Cressionnie
International Aerospace Quality Group Americas AS9100 Lead
Voting member of the U.S. TAG to ISO/TC 176
Southlake, TX

Find more information about AS9100 here.

AS9100 Rev. C Document References

Airplane, aerospace, AS9100

Q: My organization is getting ready for our registration audit to AS9100 Rev. C  — Requirements for Aviation, Space and Defense Organizations.  There is a debate regarding procedures and the document references with those procedures.  If the procedure does not mentioned a document within the body of the document we normally do not include it in the reference section of the procedure.  Our internal auditor says that we should reference all documents that show linkage in the process approach.

For example, the auditing procedure references corrective action, preventive action, etc., but does not have any of the document mentioned in the body of the procedure.

Can you settle this matter? Our auditor says that we will get a finding if this is not done.

A: The process approach is more than including references to documents, especially with AS9100 revision C requirements to identify your product realization processes.  I would encourage you to examine some guidance materials available on the ISO website:
Introduction and support package: Guidance on the concept and use of the process approach for management systems action procedures, but the narrative of the procedure does not include how these procedures tie into the auditing practice?  It would seem that the auditing procedures body should support the referenced procedures and explain how they are applicable within the auditing process.  If I was your auditor, I would issue an observation or opportunity for improvement for that condition.

Your first paragraph seems to indicate the reverse scenario.  If a document is not referenced within the body of the document, then it is not a referenced procedure.  Yes, that appears reasonable.

It is a good practice to show the interrelationship of documents to include parent-child relationships and referenced documents when appropriate.

Buddy Cressionnie
International Aerospace Quality Group Americas AS9100 Lead
Voting member of the U.S. TAG to ISO/TC 176
Southlake, TX

Value of CQA Certification in Aerospace Auditing

 

Q: What groups recognize the ASQ Certified Quality Auditor (CQA) Certification? The CQA is not enough to conduct an  internal audit to AS9100:2009 Revision C Quality management systems—Requirements for aviation, space and defense organizations, and I am not trained in AS9100C.

Why become a Certified Quality Auditor (CQA)?

A: Thank you for contacting ASQ Ask the Experts. The ASQ CQA is recognized by companies, industries and organizations worldwide as evidence of an individual that has demonstrated their ability to meet established criteria for quality management system auditing.

AS9100C contains requirements that are specific to the aerospace industry and  exceed the ASQ CQA requirements.

Having an ASQ CQA would be a good start toward obtaining an AS9100C auditor certification.  However, keep in mind that although first party internal auditors should be trained as auditors, rarely would they be required to be certified for the purpose of conducting internal (first party) audits.  I hope this helps.

Bill Aston
ASQ Senior Member
Managing Director of Aston Technical Consulting Services
Kingwood, TX
www.astontechconsult.com