Z1.4 2008: AQL, nonconformities and defects explained


Q: My question is regarding the noncomformities per hundred units and percent nonconforming.  This topic is discussed in ANSI/ASQ Z1.4-2008 Sampling Procedures and Tables for Inspection by Attributes under sections 3.2 and 3.3 on page 2.  Regardless of the explanations provided, I find myself puzzled as to what the following numbers refer to in “Table II-A– Single sampling plans for normal inspection (Master table).”

Specifically, I am having problems understanding the following unit numbers just above the Acceptance and Rejection numbers (example, 0.010, 0.015, 0.025, 1000).  Do these represent percent noncomformities and if so,  does 0.010 = 0.01%, and conversely, how can 1000 = 1000%?

As you may see, I am very confused by these numbers, and I was hoping to have some light shed on this subject. Thank you for your answers in advance.

A: The numbers on the top of the table are just as the questioner stated: .0.010 = .01% defective.  That is the acceptable quality limit (AQL) number.  Generally, most companies want 1% or less, but as noted in the table, it does go up to 1000. It is extreme to think of something being more than 100%, but consider that it may be a minor or cosmetic defect that does not affect the function but just does not look good.  Scratch and dent sales are a common result of these higher numbers.

The AQL number is the worst quality level you would expect to find at this level.  The thing you have to remember is that these plans work best when the quality is very good or very bad.  If you are at the limit, you could end up taking more samples and spend a lot of time in tightened inspection.

Many people use percent nonconforming instead of percent defective, simply because of the connotation of “defective.” No one wants to say they shipped a defective product.  They may have shipped a nonconforming product that the customer could not use simply because their requirements were too strict, where another customer may be able to use the same thing because they have less stringent requirements.

Jim Bossert
SVP Process Design Manger, Process Optimization
Bank of America
ASQ Fellow, CQE, CQA, CMQ/OE, CSSBB, CMBB
Fort Worth, TX

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